The historic blockbuster opening weekend for the Women’s Super League season threw some important discussions off the field – calls for more technology, features of play in larger arenas, and the pros and cons of a two-year Women’s World Cup.

Following Arsenal’s 3-2 draw with Chelsea on Sunday, FIFA’s management appointed former United States head coach Jill Ellis to head its technical advisory board. The Future of Women’s Football seeks to “explore ways to improve the current competitive calendar and create global growth and competitiveness”.

This coincides with a truly perfect moment for the women’s game to be broadcast in English, as new sharing agreements with Sky and the BBC to televise the Women’s Super League have brought the club’s sport to more eyes than ever before. be exposed. A four-year contract to demonstrate the merit and friendship of the national women’s team in England.

The game is in a mighty position as all three major broadcasters ride at the same time, and you have to take advantage of that.

So how do you take advantage of these precious opportunities, and what are the most compelling things off the pitch?

Many prominent names have called for the introduction of a video assistant referee after Brooke Chaplin was denied a goal at Manchester United early Friday, and Beth Mead scored Arsenal’s final goal against a defensive back. Despite showing champion Chelsea offside.

Chelsea manager Emma Hayes said girls’ sport should “demand” that technology be part of the game.

Of course Hayes is right, “we shouldn’t accept low standards for women’s football”, but those who say there are other funds now are right. There is a long list of things that need to be resolved soon with the introduction of target line technology.

First, I would like to see full-time executives in the Women’s Super League, which should be the first step in improving decision-making. Arsenal’s third target doesn’t require technology to see the flesh. It’s not that close.

Before spending millions on technology, football associations must address the serious disparity in prize money for their FA trophies. The winning teams in the men’s first round collected 22,629. Each team that wins the women’s first round gets 50,850 points. Women’s pages are well rewarded, and they get the full benefits of the game.

But even if War has taken the lead, Super League Women will not be able to establish goal line technique tomorrow. Many fans are asking ‘They already have it in Emirates, so why can’t we use it?’ But for a fair match, you can’t have a system for multiple matches in a division without it in every match, and many Women’s Super League regular grounds are not yet ready.

Man City’s Gareth Taylor won the WSL. Target line technology is called in
This brings us to another interesting aspect outside the start of the Women’s Super League season: the use of men’s Premier League stadiums.

Emirates Stadium (8,705) and Goodison Park (5,998) had the biggest crowds on the weekend and the atmosphere was alive, but the numbers on match records were still low. at 38,262. The City of Birmingham welcomes the encouragement of readers and now Leicester City in terms of match day facilities, which will play regularly on the grounds of their men’s team this season.

But I don’t agree with those calling out to clubs to use places like Emirates every week. In the long run, yes. But as the population continues to grow, such events are better planned for a few major sports each season – more often than currently planned, but not every week.

The most important task for clubs with smaller regular venues – such as Arsenal’s Borghamwood – is to start selling those venues regularly. The complete, compact stands will provide the Women’s Super League with the best environment and the best products for TV cameras.

But for all clubs to increase their crowd numbers, the league needed something straightforward and easy: more purchases from a few clubs.

It was heartbreaking to see some excitement from the social media accounts of some of the men in the club. Imagine the marketing power of a post from a leading Manchester United account with 74 million ‘likes’ on Facebook, 47 million followers on Instagram, or 27 million on Twitter. The club’s main accounts do not directly refer to the women’s team on weekends or on any day in September.

Sure, his dialogue on behalf of the women works hard to inspire a dedicated accounting team, but how hard is it to post or retweet a prominent account? The price-to-price ratio is a no-brainer. If only 0.008 percent of Manchester United’s integrated social media followers were forced to participate in their women’s team tournament, they would fill Lee Sports Village and become one of the most visited women’s pages in the world . .

Global partners also wield immense power and privilege, and FIFA is looking to explore every aspect of the game following the appointment of two-time World Cup winner Ellis.

The UK-born coach is open to the idea that women should watch the World Cup every two years instead of four, although she insisted she would like to take the time to hear other experts’ opinions.

But I am hopeful that going to the biennial World Cup will not be the light of day. Especially because the World Cup does not come frequently. Double the frequency, you will reduce the size and reduce the effect of the event.

But where I agree with Ellis, the Women’s Club World Cup is likely to start. In this hope he said: “It will be a wonderful step. In the end it will have to pass through an evil