After Rhodesia’s white leaders ceded power to Black Zimbabweans in 1980, Sister McLaughlin returned to Harare, the capital, where she joined in celebrating the installation of Robert Mugabe as the new president. Before he would plunge the once-wealthy nation into chaos, corruption and economic ruin, he asked for her help in rebuilding the educational system, and she readily agreed. Among other things, she established nine schools for former refugees and war veterans.

When she died, she was eulogized by President Emmerson Mnangagwa, Mugabe’s successor.

“She chose,” he said in a statement, “to leave an otherwise quiet life of an American nun to join rough and dangerous camp life in the jungles of Mozambique, where she worked with refugees in our education department.”

Her presence, he added, “helped give the liberation struggle an enhanced international voice and reach.”

Janice McLaughlin was born on Feb. 13, 1942, in Pittsburgh to Paul and Mary (Schaub) McLaughlin and grew up there. She graduated from high school in 1960 and attended St. Mary of the Springs College in Columbus, Ohio, for a year, then entered the Maryknoll Sisters Congregation in Maryknoll, N.Y., near the Hudson River village of Ossining, north of New York City.

The order, founded in 1912, was the first American congregation of Catholic nuns dedicated to overseas missions.



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